Assessing Progression Risk in Cancer

A molecular feature in prostate cancer, called endogenous retroviral (ERV) RNA, has been found to have prognostic value and also distinguish differences between men of African and European or Middle Eastern ancestry, according to a new study. The team also identified ERV expression signatures that may be useful for identifying prostate cancer patients at greatest risk of progression regardless of ancestry, which may also extend to progression in other cancers.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

Portable prostate cancer test may help reach underserved men

A highly portable and rapid prostate cancer screening kit could provide early warning to populations with higher incidence of prostate cancer and particularly those with limited access to health care, such as African American men.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

The prostate cancer cell that got away

Researchers have pioneered a new method to track the progression of prostate cancer in mice, from its birth to its spread into other tissues. This approach allows researchers to study the origins of prostate cancer in a more realistic context than traditional methods allow.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

New strategy against treatment-resistant prostate cancer identified

A new study has identified an RNA molecule that suppresses prostate tumors. The scientists found that prostate cancers develop ways to shut down this RNA molecule to allow themselves to grow. According to the new research — conducted in mice implanted with human prostate tumor samples — restoring this so-called long noncoding RNA could be a new strategy to treat prostate cancer that has developed resistance to hormonal therapies.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

Prostate cancer urine test identifies good prognosis patients

Researchers have shown that a prostate cancer urine test can identify men at ‚intermediate risk‘ who can safely avoid immediate treatment and benefit from ‚active surveillance‘ instead. Previously, the team’s Prostate Urine Risk (PUR) test could identify men with high and low risk cancers. But thanks to some fine-tuning, it can now help men with intermediate-risk disease – for whom treatment options had been less clear.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

Targeted prostate cancer screening could benefit men with inherited cancer syndrome

Men who inherit an increased risk of cancer through ‚Lynch syndrome‘ could benefit from regular PSA testing from age 40 to detect early signs of prostate cancer, researchers believe. Annual PSA tests were eight times more likely to spot cancer in men with genetic hallmarks of Lynch syndrome than those without. Experts say evidence could be incorporated into a targeted screening program in future.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

‘Gut bugs’ can drive prostate cancer growth and treatment resistance

Common gut bacteria can become ‚hormone factories‘ – fuelling prostate cancer and making it resistant to treatment, a new study shows. Scientists revealed how gut bacteria contribute to the progression of advanced prostate cancers and their resistance to hormone therapy — by providing an alternative source of growth-promoting androgens, or male hormones. The findings, once further validated in the clinic, could provide new opportunities for the treatment of prostate cancer through manipulation of the microbiome.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

Metastatic prostate cancer comes in two forms, which could guide treatment

Scientists have identified two subtypes of metastatic prostate cancer that respond differently to treatment, information that could one day guide physicians in treating patients with the therapies best suited to their disease.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

Studies biased toward genomes of people with European ancestry still predict cancer risk in diverse groups, research finds

Data sets that are biased by having too many genomes from people with European ancestry can still be applied to other ancestry groups to predict their risk of developing breast and prostate cancer, researchers report.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

New blood test improves prostate cancer screening

Researchers recently reported that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could reduce overdiagnoses and thereby improve prostate cancer screening. Now, the same research group shows that the addition of a novel blood test, the Stockholm3 test, can reduce the number of MRIs performed by a third while further preventing the detection of minor, low-risk tumors.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

Anti-androgen therapy can fuel spread of bone tumors in advanced prostate cancer

Anti-androgen therapy is commonly used to treat patients with advanced prostate cancer at stages where the disease has spread to the bones. However, new research has found that anti-androgen treatment can actually facilitate prostate cancer cells to adapt and grow in the bone tumor microenvironment model developed by biomedical scientists.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

New insights into androgen’s action could boost battle against prostate cancer

Researchers have unveiled important new insights into how hormones known as androgens act on our cells – and the discovery could boost efforts to develop better treatments for prostate, ovarian and breast cancers.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

Engineering T cells to attack cancer broadly

This study builds on decades of work showing that the protein IL-24 attacks cancer broadly, and is the first to deliver the protein using T cells. This approach is in contrast to CAR-T cells, which are built to recognize proteins on the surface of cancer cells and haven’t been successful against solid tumors. Mice with prostate cancer experienced shrinkage of the original tumor as well as distant metastases following treatment with IL-24 T cells.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

New prostate cancer test could avoid unnecessary biopsies

A urine test could have avoided one third of unnecessary prostate cancer biopsies while failing to detect only a small number of cancers, according to a validation study that included more than 1,500 patients.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

Genomic test helps estimate risk of prostate cancer metastasis, death

A commercially available genomic test may help oncologists better determine which patients with recurrent prostate cancer may benefit from hormone therapy, according to new research.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

An unexpected, and novel, target for prostate cancer: Our biological clock

Researchers find that CRY-1, a regulator of circadian rhythms, promotes tumor progression by altering DNA repair.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

Higher coffee intake may be linked to lower prostate cancer risk

Drinking several cups of coffee every day may be linked to a lower risk of developing prostate cancer, suggests a pooled data analysis of the available evidence.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

MRI frequently underestimates tumor size in prostate cancer

Improving imaging processes will lead to more successful treatments and help reduce morbidity in men with the disease.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

Mediterranean diet may decrease risk of prostate cancer progression

In a study to examine a Mediterranean diet in relation to prostate cancer progression in men on active surveillance, researchers found that men with localized prostate cancer who reported a baseline dietary pattern that more closely follows the key principles of a Mediterranean-style diet fared better over the course of their disease.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

Inflammation from ADT may cause fatigue in prostate cancer patients

Researchers are investigating whether inflammation in the body, a side effect of ADT, contributes to these symptoms in prostate cancer patients. They pinpoint a specific inflammation marker that is associated with increased fatigue in this group of patients.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

Prostate cancer regulator plays role in COVID-19, providing a promising treatment lead

Clinical trials underway are testing whether drugs that target the androgen receptor — successful in controlling prostate cancer — could also work against the coronavirus.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

Gene signature predicts whether localized prostate cancer is likely to spread

Researchers have identified a gene signature in localized prostate cancer that predicts the cancer’s odds of spreading and its response to a common treatment for advanced disease.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

Toward a new staging system for prostate cancer, and why it matters

The development and validation of a staging system for non-metastatic prostate cancer could help doctors and patients assess treatment options, as well as improve clinical trials.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

Cerenkov luminescence imaging identifies surgical margin status in radical prostatectomy

A new intraoperative imaging technique, Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI), can accurately assess surgical margins during radical prostatectomy, according to a first-in-human research. The feasibility study showed that 68Ga-PSMA CLI can image the entire excised prostate specimen’s surface to detect prostate cancer tissue at the resection margin.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

Advanced prostate cancer has an unexpected weakness that can be targeted by drugs

Researchers reported that the SUCLA2 gene is frequently involved in the deletion of the tumor suppressor gene RB1 in advanced prostate cancer. RB1 deletion makes cells resistant to hormone therapy but SUCLA2 deletion induces a metabolic weakness. The study showed that thymoquinone selectively killed SUCLA2-deficient prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. The findings highlight a vulnerability of advanced prostate cancer cells that can be targeted by drugs.

Quelle: Sciencedaily