How did the Coronavirus influence research? – New Episode of BIH-Podcast with John Ioannidis

During the Corona pandemic, half a million researchers from more than 170 different fields published articles about the virus or the COVID-19 disease. In the 32nd episode of the BIH-Podcast “Turning research into health”, John Ioannidis, famous meta-researcher from Stanford and Berlin, reflects about research integrity, transparency and sustainability of research results published in preprints, peer reviewed papers or social media.

https://bit.ly/BIH_Podcast_Ioannidis

Quelle: IDW Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Tracking COVID-19 across Europe

According to the World Health Organization, a third wave of COVID infections is now all but inevitable in Europe. A COVID tracker developed by IIASA researcher Asjad Naqvi, aims to identify, collect, and collate various official regional datasets for European countries, while also combining and homogenizing the data to help researchers and policymakers explore how the virus spreads.

Quelle: IDW Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Reducing data-transfer error in radiation therapy

As the complexity of radiation therapy has grown, so too has the amount of data that goes into treatment machines. With more data comes more opportunity for errors in data transfer. A medical physics researcher is working to make those errors less likely.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

It’s all in the scent: Plant inbreeding reduces attractiveness to pollinators

Researcher from Kiel University use the example of the White Campion to show which effects of habitat destruction threaten the survival of plant populations

Quelle: IDW Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Do COVID-19 vaccines care whether you’re female or male?

A researcher is studying and raising awareness about the role of sex in the efficacy of vaccines that make use of nanomedicine.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

Artificial microswimmers slow down and accumulate in low-fuel regions

A researcher has discovered that artificial microswimmers accumulate where their speed is minimized, an idea that could have implications for improving the efficacy of targeted cancer therapy.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

Killing cancer by unleashing the body’s own immune system

The body’s immune system is the first line of defense against infections like bacteria, viruses or cancers. Some cancers, however, have developed the art of molecular deception to avoid destruction by the body’s immune system. Now, a researcher might have found a new way to help the body’s immune system get past that deception and destroy the cancer.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

Fünf HHU-Forscher sind „Highly Cited Researcher 2020“

Die Analyseplattform „Web of Science“ zeichnet in diesem Jahr drei Mediziner und zwei Biologen der Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf (HHU) aufgrund ihrer vielfach rezipierten wissenschaftlichen Publikationen als „Highly Cited Researcher“ aus. Die Auszeichnung wird an Forscherinnen und Forscher verliehen, die zu den am meisten zitierten Autoren ihres Fachgebiets aus Medizin, Natur- und Sozialwissenschaften zählen.

Quelle: IDW Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Bone Loss: Perforated bone tissue from too little sugar

Bone marrow cancer is currently an incurable disease that affects about 400 people in Norway every year. One Norwegian researcher has now found an important reason for bone destruction in people with this disease.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

Cancer’s hidden vulnerabilities

To fight cancer more effectively, a researcher probes its inner workings for metabolic weaknesses.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

University of Bayreuth researcher discovers new species of spider

During a research stay in the highlands of Colombia conducted as part of her doctorate, Charlotte Hopfe, PhD student under the supervision of Prof. Dr. Thomas Scheibel at the Biomaterials research group at the University of Bayreuth, has discovered and zoologically described a new species of spider. The previously unknown arachnids are native to the central cordillera, not far from the Pacific coast, at an altitude of over 3,500 meters above sea-level. In the magazine PLOS ONE, the scientist from Bayreuth presents the spider she has called Ocrepeira klamt.

Quelle: IDW Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Tail weighing 2.5 tonnes

A team of researchers led by Dr. Verónica Díez Díaz, postdoctoral researcher at the Humboldt Universität Berlin and the Museum für Naturkunde Berlin, has reconstructed for the first time the three-dimensional musculoskeletal system of the tail of one of the sauropod dinosaurs: Giraffatitan brancai. Thanks to this detailed three-dimensional reconstruction of the tail, the authors have been able to more accurately calculate the probable weight and volume of each muscle, and even hypothesize the total values for the complete tail, weighing ca. 2.5 tonnes. The specimens used for this study are housed at the Museum für Naturkunde Berlin, and all the created digital files are freely available.

Quelle: IDW Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Scientists ID gene responsible for deadly glioblastoma

The discovery of the oncogene responsible for glioblastoma could be the brain cancer’s Achilles’ heel, one researcher says.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

Small organism with a big impact: bacterium changes gut ecosystem

Researcher at Leibniz-Institute DSMZ investigates intestinal metabolites

Quelle: IDW Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Beat it: The rhythm of animals

Researcher from the Museum für Naturkunde Berlin has found rhythmic patterns in the sounds of bats and sperm whales. Her methods can help to understand the evolution of acoustic communication and protect species that can be recognized acoustically and thus distinguished from close relatives. Pattern recognition can also help to decipher the information contained in the sounds, Lara Burchardt and Mirjam Knörnschild report in the journal “PLOS Computational Biology”. The code for carrying out the analyses on the computer, including a sample data set, is therefore available in the freely accessible “Github” repository.

Quelle: IDW Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

European Society for Evolutionary Biology awards its main prize to former young researcher from Kiel

Dr Camilo Barbosa receives the renowned John Maynard Smith Prize for his work on the prevention of antibiotic resistance

Quelle: IDW Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Freiburg researcher investigate the origins of surface texture

Most natural and artificial surfaces are rough: metals and even glasses that appear smooth to the naked eye can look like jagged mountain ranges under the microscope. There is currently no uniform theory about the origin of this roughness despite it being observed on all scales, from the atomic to the tectonic. Scientists suspect that the rough surface is formed by irreversible plastic deformation that occurs in many processes of mechanical machining of components such as milling.

Quelle: IDW Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Living through Katrina associated with higher death rate among breast cancer patients

Breast cancer patients who endured Hurricane Katrina in 2005 have a 15% higher mortality rate than those patients not exposed to the storm, according to a researcher.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

Super-antibody strategy for universal vaccines

HZI researcher discovers new selection mechanism for natural formation of broadly neutralising antibodies

Quelle: IDW Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Scientist designs ‘express courier service’ for immune cells

A researcher who is currently doing his post-doctoral training at Stanford University, has successfully invented a novel transfection method to deliver DNA into immune cells with minimal stress on these cells. This new technique is expected to boost DNA-based cancer immunotherapy by significantly improving the process of generating high-quality genetically modified immune cells.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

Prototype smartphone app can help parents detect early signs of eye disorders in children

A researcher’s prototype smartphone app — designed to help parents detect early signs of various eye diseases in their children such as retinoblastoma, an aggressive pediatric eye cancer — has passed its first big test.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

Renegade genes caught red-handed

Potentially dangerous genes embedded within human DNA were once thought to be locked down by helpful DNA structures called heterochromatin. A researcher disputes that belief and hopes to change the paradigm even further.

Quelle: Sciencedaily

First book of destination for all African amphibians

Which frogs, toads, blindworms and salamanders are there in Africa? No matter if you are a researcher or a layperson, you can determine the species quickly and easily with the first amphibian field guide, which was created by Mark-Oliver Rödel, scientist at the Museum für Naturkunde Berlin, together with a colleague from South Africa. The book is also intended to provide more information about African amphibians and thus help against amphibian extinction.

Quelle: IDW Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

The yeast researcher motivated by environmental protection

Ever since she started working on her doctorate, Elke Nevoigt has been studying yeasts. They are robust, easy to handle, and versatile: “simply a wonderful organism for laboratory research,” the scientist enthuses. Her working group at Jacobs University is playing an international leading role in yeast research. The 52-year-old scientist is also keen on these microorganisms because they provide a bridge between the traditional use of baker’s yeast for generating products such as bread, wine, and beer, and modern “white” biotechnology for the sustainable industrial production of chemicals and fuels from renewable raw materials.

Quelle: IDW Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Probing the mystery of drug resistance: New hope for leukemia’s toughest cases

A medical researcher has made it his mission to figure out why leukemia treatments cure some patients but not others. He and his team report progress on two important fronts: They shed light on how leukemia cells become resistant to drugs, and they describe how two drugs used in combination may overcome that resistance, offering new hope to thousands of children and adults with leukemia.

Quelle: Sciencedaily